JOURNAL ARTICLES

In non-triathlon related news, a cool thing happened.

Last year, I submitted two articles to an academic journal, and both were accepted. Today, both were published.

Feel free to give them a read if you’re curious.

The Advantages of Gay Parents: Examining the Outcomes of Children of Same and Different-Sex Parents:
March 26, 2019

Abstract

In Canada, approximately 0.8% of couples are of the same sex, and there are approximately 10,000 children living with a same-sex couple (Statistics Canada 2015). At this time, there are no Canadian studies examining outcomes of children raised by same-sex parents compared with their peers raised by different-sex parents. Given that mental health, physical health, and educational outcomes among children from Western nations are generally comparable, it follows that data from multiple American, European, and Australian studies may be expected to predict trends for outcomes in Canadian children. A remarkable number of studies on the topic have emerged in recent years in the United States, Europe, and Australia. This paper reviews international studies on various outcomes of children of same-sex parents, and seeks to apply the findings in a Canadian context. Specifically, this paper will review outcomes of children with same-sex versus different-sex parents on measures related to three broad categories: psychological well-being, physical health, and education. After adjusting for socioeconomic factors such as income and education, no significant differences are discernible in health and development between children of same-sex couples versus children of different-sex couples. Additionally, some scholars have noted that children of same-sex couples outperform their peers on matters of education and civic engagement. Perceived differences between the two groups are more likely attributable to secondary factors such as parental income, level of education, and parental engagement with their children.
Click HERE and then click “download” to read the full article.

 

People Worthy of Respect: Healthcare Disparities in Trans Canadians:
March 26, 2019

Abstract

When people feel stigmatized, judged or bullied in a certain setting, it follows that they will avoid that setting as much as possible. Research shows this is exactly what is happening with trans people in Canada who require medical care. Despite being entitled to equal access to healthcare, trans Canadians frequently face stigma and discrimination which leads to unmet health needs. Consequently, they are less likely to seek care, even in the event of a medical emergency. This paper explores the reasons why trans Canadians are at greater risk for poor health, and examines possible solutions to this complex social problem. There are three distinct, but related, reasons why trans people face elevated risks. First, trans people suffer greater stigma and discrimination in their daily lives than does the general public; this places them at higher risk for mental illness, addictions, and high-risk behaviours. Secondly, the medical system and medical professionals have a history of discriminating against trans patients. Finally, as a result of stigma and discrimination, trans people are less likely to seek preventative care or care for non-life-threatening ailments than are members of the general public. These factors combine to create system of inequitable health care for trans Canadians. Solutions to these problems require that the healthcare system, and healthcare practitioners, first change the way that they view and treat trans patients: as people worthy of respect.
Click HERE and then click “download” to read the full article.